The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Backyard Farming. Urban Homesteading Sustainablity
The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Soil Preparation or Winter Garden?

By now our tomato plants are winding down and we have already pulled our summer squash. Winter squash is still a couple weeks away from harvest but the peppers should be ready by the end of next week. Now it’s time to decide what to do with all this garden space.

webmail.eugenebackyardfarmerWe live in a climate that allows for plenty of winter gardening opportunities, and we have plenty of cole crop starts available now with more on the way. Most Brassica crops, such as kale, broccoli, or cauliflower, will do well with little fall and winter maintenance. Just a plant cover should protect them from freezing on extremely cold nights.

Fall is also the perfect time to plant garlic, onions, and shallots. These plants require a freeze so you want to get them in the ground by mid-October so that they can develop enough of a root system to withstand winter temperatures. Our new favorite trick is to plant them along the perimeter of the garden space for pest control (find details at https://www.369bugs.com/pest-control/), and so they won’t take up valuable spring planting space before they are ready to harvest. We have some onion starts available now and garlic, onion sets, and shallots should be available early next week.

But if you don’t want to tend a winter garden, there are still things you can do this fall to help your garden rest for a few months. If you have chickens, consider giving them access to your garden. They will scratch and turn the soil and will leave some fertilizer behind.

If you don’t have chickens but need to restore your garden space over the winter, we have a fresh batch of fertilizer and many soil amendments in stock, including our custom Indigenous Micro Organism blend. These IMOs are cultured and grown at the store and make a great soil amendment or compost accelerator. Turn these amendments into the soil then lay down some newspaper or cardboard and cover the area with leaves or straw.

We also like to plant low-maintenance cover crops by mid-October to fix nitrogen into the soil during the off season. We sell buckwheat, crimson clover, and winter pea by the pound. When you’re ready to turn over your soil or till in your cover crop, remember that we do rent a broadfork to make a tough job so much easier.

While so many of us look forward to spring as the time to garden, the fall offers just another reason to go out and play in the dirt.

posted by Bill Bezuk in Uncategorized and have Comments Off on Soil Preparation or Winter Garden?