The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Backyard Farming. Urban Homesteading Sustainablity
The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Raising Ducks in Your Backyard

IMG_1173Few species are more helpful in creating a thriving, biodynamic urban farm than the domestic duck. Like chickens, many duck breeds are prolific layers of large, high-protein eggs, but unlike chickens ducks are easy on crops; ducks love nothing more than an afternoon in the garden, dodging established plants while helping you with your weeding and taking care of that slug problem before it starts. Duck manure is high in nitrogen but not as hot as chicken manure, so you won’t have to worry about it burning your plants. Duck eggs are nearly twice the size of most chicken eggs, and are excellent for baking. Duck eggs are also high in protein and Omega-3 vitamins and some people who are allergic to chicken eggs can still eat duck eggs. Duck eggshells can range in color from pale blue or green to bone white and even black. While breeds like Indian Runner and Khaki Campbell often take the prize for most prolific layer, Cayuga, Blue Swedish, Buff, Welsh Harlequin and many others produce a respectable number of eggs in a season and can add interest to a flock.

Ducks and chickens can happily coexist in the same coop and run, but ducks do have some special requirements. Ducks naturally prefer to sleep out in the open, preferably on the water, so they won’t head to the coop at dusk as your chickens might. However, domestic ducks are even more vulnerable to predator attacks than chickens, so they need to be kept in a secure enclosure at night. Luckily, ducks love routine and are easy to herd into the coop.

While you don’t need a pond to raise happy ducks, you will need to provide some source of clean water for your waterfowl to
bathe, play, and drink. Ducks go through a lot of water each day, so plan for your chosen container to have a drain: we like stock tanks with built in
drains toward the bottom. To get the most out of having ducks, attach a hose to the drain so those valuable duck effluents can water your squash hills or berry bushes.

Ducks can also be a great source of flavorful, healthy meat raised no farther away than your backyard. Many of the duck breeds we sell are dual-purpose, meaning that they are great egg layers but also great table birds. Watch for breeds like Khaki Campbell, Blue Swedish, Buff, Muscovy or Rouen if you’re interested in raising your own duck meat.

One of the biggest joys of keeping ducks is taking home ducklings! Like chicks, ducklings need to stay inside under a heat lamp until true feathers replace their down. Ducklings eat chick starter (non-medicated only) for the same duration as chicks; start transitioning your ducklings to a grower pellet between 4-6 weeks of age. Ducklings need a larger waterer than chicks because even when they are newly hatched they need to wash their tiny bills after eating.  A standard 1-gal. chicken waterer will do just fine.

Because ducklings go through so much water and love to splash and play, we recommend brooding your chicks and ducklings separately. Once they are both feathered out, however, they can share the same housing.

Ducklings can easily get cold and love to make a mess of their bedding, so try to clean the brooder as needed to make sure your babies have somewhere dry to sleep. While your ducklings are under a week old, make sure to only provide lukewarm water–cold water can shock their system and can be fatal.

We hope you try your hand at raising a flock of ducks this year! We will carry several breeds of ducklings over the course of the season, so be sure to check in and ask about the differences between the breeds. As always, we are happy to try to answer any questions that might arise as you explore adding ducks to your urban farm.

For a list of expected ducklings and chicks follow the link below to get to the calendar tab of our web site. Be sure to click on the date to get a drop down box of all expected arrivals.
http://eugenebackyardfarmer.com/calendar/

posted by Bill Bezuk in Uncategorized and have Comments Off on Raising Ducks in Your Backyard