The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Backyard Farming. Urban Homesteading Sustainablity
The Eugene Backyard Farmer

Bee Swarms

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A swarm of bees can be a most powerful thing to witness. Seeing thousands of bees flying in unison and then landing on a tree branch can certainly be considered an awesome experience. It is such an amazing thing so it is understandable how some people can become afraid or intimidated by their presence. But we want to help get these swarms into a safe and welcoming environment and you can help.

A swarm is a sign of a healthy and thriving bee colony. When an active hive becomes too large to be sustainable it will make a new queen and the old queen will take half of the established colony and go out in search of a new home. A swarm could land on a tree branch or the side of a building and they have even been known to land on a locked bike, mail box or any other stationary object. When bees swarm they have no hive, honey, or brood to protect and are for the most part very gentle and rarely sting.

A swarm consists of a few thousand bees with the queen in the middle and will be about the size of a basketball. Just a bunch of bees flying does not make a swarm. Once the bees are in a temporary location, they will then send scout bees in search of a new home. The scout bees can fly up to five miles and when they think they have found a suitable home, they will share that location with other scout bees. This is a highly democratic process as the bees compare all their available options in search of their perfect home. A swarm can stay in this temporary location for as little as five minutes and for as long as two weeks.

When the scout bees have all decided upon a perfect new home, the swarm will move en masse to the new location. Their chosen location could be a vacant hive or a hollow tree but the bees could also move into a place like a shed or a wall where they are not welcome. For this reason, we want to capture the swarms and introduce them to a welcoming and safe vacant hive around town. Capturing a swarm is normally a very easy process assuming it is low to the ground (under 12 feet is ideal).

Most swarms happen between April and early June. If you see a swarm around town, please call our store or a beekeeper friend so that we can reduce the time the bees are exposed and transfer them to a safe place. A honeybee swarm is in a vulnerable state. Considering the plight of the honeybee, we want to everything we can to help them along.

posted by Bill Bezuk in Uncategorized and have Comments Off on Bee Swarms